ARISE Life Skill Lessons and Staff Training

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Evidence-Based Life Skills Lessons and Professional Staff Training
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ARISE in Washington, DC

ARISE for Change

ARISE for Change combines the evidence-based practice of Motivational Interviewing (MI) with the ARISE Drop It at the Door training to provide youth and staff with effective communication skills.

ARISE for Change aims to increase pro-social outcomes of youth, decrease the number of youth entering the juvenile justice system, and reduce the number of youth that reactivate.

ARISE for Change combines a three-day training program for staff with 28 one-hour youth sessions.

 


 

Some of the training topics are:

  • Positive youth and staff development
  • Effective communication skills
  • Employing empathy
  • Reflective listening
  • Promoting change talk
  • Rolling with resistance
  • How your thoughts affect your behavior

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Staff training

The staff training is designed to build supportive relationships where staff listen, engage and positively influence the youth to work through the stages of change model. High-risk youth need empathetic staff that can facilitate effective goal setting and guide them through positive, pro-social change processes.

During the staff training, participants will learn:

  • The importance of values
  • How change works
  • The power of choice
  • How to enhance internal change
  • Rapport building and collaboration
  • Ways to handle anger and stress in their lives
  • Skills to engage and influence others

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How staff felt about the training

  • B.P., House of Seven Steps:
    “The training was very informative, eye opening and it allowed me to look into myself.”
  • C.E., House of Seven Steps:
    “The activity What Would I Like to Change in My Life impacted me the most. I am better able to drop my issues at the door after this training. I also now realize I have a choice when I react to stress and anger.”
  • A.G., Renaissance House:
    “This training exceeded my expectations. I plan to use this information at work and at home. I learned tools that can help me handle angry situations.”
  • D.W., Comfort House:
    “This training exceeded my expectations. Living in the red zone (frustration, stress, anger) or the blue zone (peace, happiness) made a strong impact on me.”
  • D.C., Universal Day Break:
    “The trainer did such an outstanding job and nothing needs improvement. I liked the entire training. It was enlightening, uplifting and informational. I was greatly impacted by the topic of the difference between what you can control and what you can influence”
  • J.B. – Dupree House, DC “I think the program can help me when I get out of this place. It helps me with people skills and how to become an overall better person.”
  • C.C– Dupree House, DC “This program is good, and it will help me with my behavior.”
  • L.I. – Dupree House, DC –“I thought the program was okay. The program taught me a lot about myself.”
  • E.H. – House of Seven Steps, DC “This program helps me control my temper and feelings. I am thankful for this program because it makes me understand how others feel. Thank you.
  • D.D. – House of Seven Steps, DC – “I have learned how to be a good person all around and how to better myself for the future. Another thing I learned is how to manage my anger better now.”

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Youth sessions:

Youth enhance their readiness to change their behavior by learning to decrease negative behavior, listen reflectively, express themselves and make more pro-social choices.

One lesson that is completed in the first few sessions involves the youth identifying changes they want to make. Then they work on achieving those changes throughout the remaining sessions.

During the youth sessions, participants will learn:

  • The importance of values
  • How change works
  • The power of choice
  • How to enhance internal change
  • Rapport building and collaboration
  • Ways to handle anger and stress in their lives
  • Skills to engage and influence others
  • How to work toward achievable goals

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Training Session Photos

 

Facilities and Instructors

One Judiciary Square

Training - Wall of Inspiration Things I Worry About That Never Happen Things from the Past I Worry About
Wall of Inspiration Board

Things I Worry About
That Never Happen Board

Things From The Past
I Worry About Board

Health Issues I Worry About Training Evaluation Life Skills Training
Health Issues I Worry
About Board

Training Expectation Board

Module 9:
Worry is a Choice

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Some changes the youth talked about making during the sessions

L.H.: “I need to change my decision making skills. If I don’t make better decisions I can be locked up again. If I make changes and I make better decisions, people will look up to me and will respect me. If I make better decisions younger kids can look up to me.”

This shows the facilitator that L.H. is thinking about change and has some motivation to change. For the rest of the sessions, decision making skills will be a theme that this young person works on.

S.I.: “I want to stop using drugs completely. When I smoke or do drugs, I trip out and I cannot focus on school. I have a baby and need to get a high school diploma. If I don’t change, I feel I will be killed or hurt.”

This shows the facilitator that S.I. is definitely thinking about change, and he is ready for a change plan. The first step is to understand that you need to change and what will happen if you don’t change. This was all youth-centered. Judy Lyons (the youth facilitator) does not preach and teach; she uses reflective listening skills to allow the youth to feel safe in discussing where they are at that moment in time.

O.W.: “If I don’t make changes in my life, I will soon be over 18 and can be committed to the DC Jail.”

P.C.: “If I do change, my family will be happy and I can get a good job.”

O.W. and P.C. are thinking about change but are not at the same place as L.H. and S.I. They have not identified specifically what they want to change. They need to be guided through reflective listening and open-ended questions to decide on an area they most want to change. To help them understand the consequences of changing and not changing, in a previous session they learned the “ABC chain,” which allows them to look at actions they have taken— A (Antecedent) what happened first; then B (Behavior chosen); and C (Consequences resulting from that behavior).

Youth Testimonials

J.B. – Dupree House, DC
“I think the program can help me when I get out of this place. It helps me with people skills and how to become an overall better person.”

C.C– Dupree House, DC
“This program is good, and it will help me with my behavior.”

L.I. – Dupree House, DC
“I thought the program was okay. The program taught me a lot about myself.”

E.H. – House of Seven Steps, DC
“This program helps me control my temper and feelings. I am thankful for this program because it makes me understand how others feel. Thank you.

D.D. – House of Seven Steps, DC
“I have learned how to be a good person all around and how to better myself for the future. Another thing I learned is how to manage my anger better now.”

K.J. – District of Columbia Group Home “I have learned to control my anger and not to “Kirk off” so quickly.. I also learned about affirmations and compliments and how to give them.

A.M. – District of Columbia Group Home, “I learned how to communicate effectively and to listen. I learned the difference between sympathy and empathy. I also learned that a smile is one of the most powerful tools you can have.

K.O. – District of Columbia Group Home “I learned about self-efficacy”

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More ARISE Activities in Washington, DC

Facilities and Instructors

ARISE has enlisted over 100 organizations throughout the district into the ARISE Life Management Skills program, including Metropolitan Police officers, the Youth Service Center and public/charter schools.

ARISE has trained and certified over 1,000 ARISE Life Management Skills Instructors in the Washington D.C. area who have gone on to teach essential life skills using ARISE’s specialized, easily understood curricula. ARISE reaches an average of 1,000 young men and women each week. Many are still held under lock and key and others are fresh out of juvenile detention. Focus groups report that ARISE is effectively connecting with these disengaged youth.

Often these youth are not inspired by acts of kindness or compassion at home or on the streets. Menacing anti-social behavior and finely cultivated animosity are lessons life has taught them. Their last best chance to learn essential life and workplace skills is the ARISE program.

Click on the map image to the right to view a full listing of the Washington, DC Facilities where ARISE Life Skills programs currently operate.

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Impact of ARISE for Change Youth Sessions

Summary for Umbrella Youth Services
March 14, 2011

Module 7
Tonight was the best session that I have experienced with the participants at Umbrella Youth Services. There were three participants present for tonight’s group session. We reviewed about the red zone and the blue zone. One of the participants read the story of the two wolves out loud. Each participant expressed their feelings about the story. The participants really expressed themselves when I asked them to share a time when they fed either wolf. The discussion was very interesting. The staff even came to the group and shared about her son being killed four years ago. This was an amazing session.

Summary for Universal Daybreak
March 8, 2011

Module 14
There were five participants present for today’s group session. This session started off great. The participants came to group in a respectful manner. I let one of the participants lead the group today and he did a great job. The participants really enjoyed both video clips. They shared their feelings. We went over the tools for staying cool on worksheet 28. The took turns reading. We also went over different calming phrases among other things. The participants were so well behaved tonight even the staff was amazed. I really enjoyed this group tonight.

Summary for Universal Grandma’s House
March 3, 2011

Module 14
There were three participants present for today’s group session. The participants are very cheerful today. They seemed to enjoy the Jackie Robinson video clip. We discussed Jackie Robinson’s situation. The each gave their opinion of the thought that Jackie Robinson must have been thinking. One participant said he gave the You’ve been noticed doing something good card. He talked about how the person felt when he gave the card to the person. We went over the different techniques on how to stay cool. They really enjoyed that. We brainstormed on a role play and collectively came up with calming statements. This was a good session.

Summary for New Beginnings
March 5, 2011

Module 9
There were four participants present for today’s group session. The participants are always on time and they are eager to learn. They are willing to share their experiences throughout the week. They also share experiences that relate to the activity. We all shared the ten most important values to each other. Then they all shared their most important value.. We also went over the questions on worksheet 18. Each participant answered each question out loud. We have great discussions. This was a great session.

Summary for Universal Daybreak
March 2, 2011

There were six out of seven participants present for tonight’s group session. We did a review over the material that we have covered. We had a discussion about the reason I am here and that we are trying to make real the materials that we are learning in group in our everyday lives. First I asked the participants to list some positive things about themselves. Then we put everyone’s name on a small piece of paper. Each participants took a piece of paper, then one by one each participant said something positive about whose name they picked. It was a lot of fun. They really enjoyed this activity. I also gave positive compliments about each person. After we finished that, we talked about how it felt to have positive things said about them. They all were grinning at each positive statement. This was a very successful lesson. Mr. Reshard, a staff at Universal Daybreak, stated that they really did their chore well after group and cleaned their rooms. We are going to just practice saying something positive to one another from now on.

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